Find internet providers in your area

Internet provider availability varies by location, but finding the best providers near you is easy with Allconnect. We’ve done the research to help you compare pricing, speeds, features and more from 30+ of the nation’s best internet providers, all in one place. You’ll find our top picks and tips to finding the right provider on this page.

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Best internet providers of 2021

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A good home internet provider will offer reliable service over a broad area with multiple speed options at competitive prices. The best internet service providers (ISPs) have these qualities plus unique features, such as unlimited data or free equipment, that set them apart from all other providers. 

Our list of the best ISPs below highlights eight national providers that are the “best” in their own way. Find out what each provider offers when it comes to pricing, speeds, data caps, contracts and more.

AT&T logo

AT&T

Best fiber optic availability

AT&T internet covers 40% of U.S. residents with nearly a third of their network consisting of 100% fiber-optic lines.

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Download speeds

5 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

Technology

DSL, fiber optic

Contract

One year or no contract

Data cap

1 TB/mo. DSL, unlimited with AT&T Fiber
CenturyLink logo

CenturyLink

Best for fast DSL speeds

With speeds of up to 100 Mbps or higher where available, CenturyLink is one of the fastest DSL providers available.

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Download speeds

3 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

Technology

DSL, fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

1 TB/mo.
Cox logo

Cox

Best for internet bundle discounts

Cox makes bundling internet and TV rewarding by extending deep discounts, up to $50/mo. or more, off the total price.

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Download speeds

10 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$29.99-$99.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

One year

Data cap

1 TB/mo.
Frontier FiberOptic logo

Frontier FiberOptic

Best for no hidden fees

No contracts, no hidden fees and internet equipment included means less surprises on your bill.

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Download speeds

50 – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$49.99-$79.99

Technology

DSL, fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

None
HughesNet logo

HughesNet

Best satellite internet provider

HughesNet fills the broadband gap in many areas where cable, DSL and fiber-optic internet providers do not reach.

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Download speeds

25-25 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$39.99-$139.99

Technology

Satellite

Contract

Two years

Data cap

No hard data caps
Spectrum logo

Spectrum

Best for low fees

Spectrum internet plans include unlimited data plus a modem at no extra cost, and your router rental fee is only an additional $5/mo.

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Download speeds

60-940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$49.99-$109.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

None

Data cap

None
Verizon Fios logo

Verizon Fios

Best fiber-optic provider

Verizon has arguably the best plan options of any major fiber-optic provider with 200, 400 and up to 940/880 Mbps speeds.

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Download speeds

200- up to 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$39.99-$79.99

Technology

Fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

None
XFINITY logo

XFINITY

Best for fastest max speeds

Xfinity’s Gigabit Pro internet plan boasts the fastest residential download speeds of any provider, up to 2,000 Mbps.

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Download speeds

50 – 2,000 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$20.00-$299.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

No long-term agreement required

Data cap

1 TB/mo. for most plans

Search internet providers for plans in your area

Check availability

Or call us today: (844) 451-2720

Home Internet availability and service areas

When shopping for a new home internet provider, it’s likely you’ll discover internet options you previously didn’t know were available. It’s just as likely, however, that some ISPs you thought were (or hoped would be) available are not.

FCC broadband mapping does not provide precise enough information on how much of a community is served by a provider. Currently, the maps will only tell you whether the community is served at all or not, but this is not helpful to the individual who needs to know if their specific home will have internet access. And broadband access can vary significantly even in a single community, where one side of a street has access to fiber optic, for instance, and the other side does not. 

Operating costs and the expense of bringing new technologies, such as fiber optic cables, to new locations can limit the areas where internet providers offer service. Additionally, competing in markets where another provider is already established can further limit profitability, which is why you’ll rarely find more than one provider of the same service type (fiber optic, cable, DSL) in an area.

Individuals who live in more rural areas are particularly likely to have internet availability issues as internet companies often abandon rural areas and focus on higher-density areas that will provide them with a higher return on their infrastructure investments.

Where to find the best internet providers

Don’t see your local internet provider?

The internet companies listed above cover much of the U.S. population, but there are hundreds of smaller, regional providers. These providers extend internet coverage to areas where the largest providers do not reach, or provide some often much-needed competition in areas where there is already a major internet provider established. 

We’ve listed some of the top regional providers and their service areas below, but there may be other internet options in your area.

Top regional internet service providers and service areas

  • Atlantic Broadband – Available in 10 states. Primary service areas include eastern Connecticut, Maryland and Virginia, central Pennsylvania and New Hampshire and the Aiken, South Carolina area.
  • Mediacom – Available in 22 states. Primary service areas include the Midwest, South and communities along the Atlantic coast in Delaware and North Carolina.
  • Optimum – Available in four states. Primary service areas include Brooklyn, NY and the greater New York City region.
  • RCN – Available in five states. Primary service areas include Chicago, IL; Boston, MA; Manhattan and Queens, NY; Allentown and western Philadelphia, PA and Washington D.C.
  • Sonic – Available in one state. Primary service areas include the greater Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose and Santa Rosa, California areas.
  • Starry Internet – Available in four states. Primary service areas include Los Angeles, CA; Denver, CO; Boston, MA; New York, NY and Washington, D.C.
  • Suddenlink – Available in 14 states. Primary service areas include select rural and suburban parts of Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas and West Virginia.
  • Windstream – Available in 18 states. Primary service areas include rural and suburban parts of the Eastern, Midwest, Southern and Southwestern U.S.
  • Ziply Fiber – Available in four states. Primary service areas include regions in the Pacific Northwest formerly served by Frontier.

Find internet providers near you

Whether you’re shopping for cheap internet service, a faster plan or an all-around better internet provider, we can help you find the service that’s right for you.

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Home Internet shopping tips from our experts

How do I find ISPs in my area? How much should I pay for internet? After 20+ years of helping people find the best internet service for their homes, we’ve become experts at answering internet questions like these and ones you may not know you had.

Find your speed, present and future

Speed is one of the most important considerations when choosing an internet service. Discover what speeds you need and take our speed test to see what you’re currently getting.

Test your current speed

Finding affordable internet goes beyond comparing plan pricing. Look for hidden costs that come with renting equipment, exceeding your data cap and cancelling service to get an idea of the true cost of internet. Also, be mindful of ways you can save, like switching providers or using your own compatible equipment.

Explore more ways to reduce your internet bill

Make the most of your internet connection. We’ll show you how to detect and prevent internet security threats, troubleshoot common internet problems and boost your Wi-Fi signal.

Learn how to boost your Wi-Fi signal

Compare internet service providers

Comparing internet service providers head-to-head is one of the best ways to avoid overpaying for internet service or signing up for a plan that doesn’t fit your needs.

Many of the providers below may not be available in your area, but you can use this list to see how the largest providers compare to the ones that are available near you.

We’ve found that fiber optic internet providers such as AT&T and Verizon Fios are often best for speed, connection quality and overall value. 

Fiber is only available to about 40% of U.S. households, however, so many rely on cable internet providers like Cox, Spectrum and Xfinity for their high-speed internet. Cable providers are also often best for cheap internet with Cox, Mediacom, Optimum and Xfinity offering some of the cheapest plans available. 

Bargain shoppers can also look to DSL service from providers including Frontier and Windstream for low-cost service, especially in rural areas. Satellite internet from HughesNet or Viasat is another popular option in rural areas but is likely to come with relatively slow speeds and high pricing.

Search internet providers for plans in your area

Or call us today: (844) 451-2720

How to choose the best home internet service

The first thing you want to do when choosing a provider is to determine if fiber optic internet is available in your area. Fiber optic will give you the fastest, most reliable speeds for the best value, so if it’s available in your area, that’s what you will likely want to go with. However, if fiber optic isn’t available, then your next best option is cable internet. 

Beyond looking at service type, you will also want to take cost, speed, pricing and customer satisfaction into account. If you want to determine whether the provider you are considering offers a good value, divide the price by the speed plan you are considering (cost/Mbps) and compare among providers. The lowest result is the best value. In most areas, AT&T, Verizon and Xfinity offer the best values available. 

Once you choose your provider, you will also need to determine which speed plan is best for you. This will have to do with what type of internet user you are and how many members there are in your household. If you are a household larger than four that works and learns from home, streams from multiple devices at a time and likes to live game, for instance, then you will need a fairly robust internet plan. 

Learn more about the speeds you need

Internet technology types

Not all internet connections are the same. Each internet type and provider presents specific advantages and potential disadvantages.

Internet provider FAQs

How do I find internet providers near me?

Home Internet availability differs by address. To search for internet providers near you, click the blue Check availability button above and enter your address or the address you’ll be moving to. We’ll show you starting pricing and speeds for available internet providers in your area.

In most areas of the country, internet providers will have their own zones that other providers have agreed not to compete in. Although it is possible that one provider will serve an entire community, this is often not the case. Instead, one provider might serve one side of the street and another provider might serve the other side if that’s how the zones are constructed. The only way you can truly know which providers are available for your home is to input your address. If you just provide a ZIP code, you can know which providers are in your area, but that will not guarantee they are all available to you.

Your home internet speeds are at the mercy of what the provider and technology is capable of delivering. This is most common with DSL and satellite internet providers (specifically Viasat), but may be the case with some cable internet providers as well.

The speeds you can get with DSL service largely depend on how far you are from the provider or their access points. The farther away your address is, the slower your available speeds are likely to be. For example, DSL provider CenturyLink may advertise speeds of 100 Mbps, but if your address is too far away to be eligible for those speeds, you may only be available for speeds up to, say, 25 Mbps.

Similarly, Viasat advertises speeds up to 100 Mbps, but many locations may only be able to get 12, 25 or 50 Mbps because that’s all the technology is capable of delivering in those areas.

Once you have identified available internet providers in your area, you’ll want to consider a number of factors to narrow down your search.

Introductory and standard pricing – In addition to a provider’s introductory plan pricing, also consider the price hike that may come a year or two after service. Some providers, like Cox and Xfinity, can have steep price increases after the first year while others, such as CenturyLink and Frontier, offer a price for life guarantee on select plans.

Initial and ongoing costs – Will installation and activation fees cost you hundreds before you even get service? Or will ongoing equipment fees and data overages add 30% to your monthly bill? Consider what a provider charges upfront and month after month in addition to the plan pricing, and look for ways to save. Look for providers that offer free installation and low equipment rental costs or the option to use your own equipment.

Available speeds – More than half of our surveyed users said they valued speed above all else when choosing an internet provider. Make sure the provider you are considering has the speeds you need, and ideally a faster plan to upgrade to if you need more speed, or a slower, cheaper plan if you find you have more speed than you need.

Technology – As we mentioned above, fiber optic is generally the best connection type because it offers reliably fast download and upload speeds. If fiber is not available in your area, cable is the next best option for speed and value, but DSL may be a better option if you value price over speed. Lastly, satellite is a common go-to internet service in rural areas where fiber and cable are not available. Residents of rural areas may want to consider fixed wireless providers since they often have lower latency and higher data allowances than satellite providers.

David Anders

Written by:

David Anders

Senior Writer, Broadband Content

David joined the Allconnect team in 2017, specializing in broadband and TV content. His work has been referenced by a variety of sources, including ArcGIS, DIRECTV and more. As a Senior Writer, David is motivate… Read more

Shannon Ullman

Edited by:

Shannon Ullman

Editor, Broadband & Wireless Content

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