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Internet providers in your area

We combed through the fine print to help you compare the speed, pricing and customer service from the internet providers in your area.

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Shop for internet with confidence

Best internet providers of 2021

Many Americans don’t have a whole lot of choice in their internet — around 1 in 4 can only access broadband through one provider — so most of us just go with whichever provider is in our area. But if you’re lucky enough to have options, we’ve analyzed all the nationwide players, comparing speeds, customer service ratings and pricing to discover which deserve the title of best internet providers.

AT&T logo

AT&T

Best fiber optic speeds

AT&T Fiber has the fastest average speeds of any provider. But if you can only get AT&T’s DSL service, speeds will be much slower.

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Download speeds

10 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

Technology

DSL, fiber optic

Contract

One year or no contract

Data cap

1TB/mo. DSL, unlimited with AT&T Fiber
CenturyLink logo

CenturyLink

Most affordable plans

Almost all of CenturyLink’s plans cost just $49/mo.*, and you won’t have to worry about your bill going up unexpectedly.

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Download speeds

10 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

Technology

DSL, fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

1TB/mo.
Cox logo

Cox

Best TV and internet bundles

Cox makes bundling internet and TV rewarding by extending deep discounts, up to $50/mo. or more, off the total price.

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Download speeds

10 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$19.99-$99.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

One year

Data cap

1 TB/mo.
Frontier FiberOptic logo

Frontier FiberOptic

Best for no hidden fees

No contracts, no hidden fees and internet equipment included means less surprises on your bill.

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Download speeds

500 – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$49.99-$74.99

Technology

DSL, fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

None
HughesNet logo

HughesNet

Best satellite internet provider

HughesNet fills the broadband gap in many areas where cable, DSL and fiber-optic internet providers do not reach.

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Download speeds

25-25 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$39.99-$139.99

Technology

Satellite

Contract

Two years

Data cap

No hard data caps
Spectrum logo

Spectrum

Fast speeds and low fees

Spectrum internet plans start at a generous 200 Mbps, and your router rental fee is just $5/mo. extra.

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Download speeds

200-940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$49.99-$109.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

None

Data cap

None
Verizon Fios logo

Verizon Fios

Best provider overall

Verizon’s fiber optic service offers the best combination of speed and price, and unlike most providers, the price doesn’t increase after the first year.

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Download speeds

200 – 940 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$39.99-$79.99

Technology

Fiber-optic

Contract

None

Data cap

None
Xfinity logo

Xfinity

Best cable internet provider

If you can’t get fiber internet in your area, Xfinity is the next best option. Its cable service can reach speeds of 2,000 Mbps and you’ll get a year of Peacock Premium for free.

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Download speeds

50 – 2,000 Mbps

Monthly price range*

$19.99-$299.99

Technology

Cable

Contract

No long-term agreement required

Data cap

1 TB/mo. for most plans

Search internet providers for plans in your area

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Or call us today: (844) 451-2720

Allconnect logo

Internet shopping tips from our experts

How much should I pay for internet? What’s a good internet speed? After 20+ years of helping people find the best internet service for their homes, we’ve become experts at answering internet questions like these and ones you may not know you had.

Internet 101

Don’t know a bit from a byte? We cut through the jargon to help you understand what kind of plan you actually need. Learn the internet terms you’ve always wondered about, what’s considered a good speed and the difference between upload and download speeds.

Read our first-time internet buyer’s guide

Speed is one of the most important considerations when choosing an internet service. The average household in the U.S. gets around 200 Mbps of download speed, but many people can get by with less. Discover what speeds you need and take our speed test to see what you’re currently getting.

Test your current speed

Finding affordable internet goes beyond comparing plan pricing. Look for hidden fees, price increases and data caps and cancelling service to get an idea of the true cost of internet. Also, be mindful of ways you can save, like switching providers or buying your own modem and router.

Learn how to lower your monthly bill

Compare the best service providers for home internet

Comparing providers head-to-head is one of the best ways to avoid overpaying for internet service or signing up for a plan that doesn’t fit your needs. Not all providers will be available in your area, but you can use this list to see how the largest ones compare to what’s available near you.


How to choose the best home internet service

Chances are, you don’t have a ton of providers to choose from when picking internet service. But even if you’re picking from a small pool, there are still a ton of questions you have to answer to make the best decision. Here’s what you should consider: 

  1. Decide how much speed you need. The average household in the U.S. gets around 200 Mbps of download speed, but many people can get by with less. 
  2. See what’s available in your area. If fiber optic internet is available in your area, it will almost always give you the fastest, most reliable speeds for the best value. If you can’t get fiber, your next best option is cable internet, but DSL may be a better choice if you’re looking for the cheapest plans. Lastly, satellite is a common go-to internet service in rural areas where fiber and cable are not available. Residents of rural areas may want to consider fixed wireless providers since they often have lower latency and higher data allowances than satellite providers.
  3. Read the fine print. Almost all providers charge extra fees for equipment rental and installation, but many also raise prices after the first year. It’s also worth comparing data caps and contracts between providers. 
  4. Consider buying your own equipment. Most providers charge $10-15/mo. for equipment, but you can almost always use your own to avoid that fee. Buying your own modem and router typically costs around $100. 
  5. Look at promotions for new customers. You can often find perks like rewards cards or free streaming subscriptions when you activate service. Factor in the dollar value for these extras before you make your final decision. 

Internet technology types

Not all internet connections are the same. Each internet type and provider presents specific advantages and potential disadvantages.

Internet provider FAQs

Is Allconnect an internet provider?

No. We don’t provide internet service ourselves, but we connect you with the providers that are available in your area.

Some people can get by using only their cellphone plan for internet, but most of us require a stronger home internet connection. These plans have speeds up to 1,000 Mbps, so you can connect dozens of devices around your home without worrying about buffering or glitchy video calls. If you’re going to be working or learning from home, streaming HD video or gaming online, a home internet connection is essential. But if all you’re doing is checking email and scrolling social media on one device at a time, you can probably get by with your cellphone’s data plan.

The speed you’re advertised on your internet plan refers to the maximum speeds you can expect, so you’ll often experience slower speeds in practice. This might be fixable through things like better router placement or playing with the settings, but oftentimes it’s out of your control.

Your home internet speeds are at the mercy of what the provider and technology is capable of delivering. This is most common with DSL and satellite internet providers (specifically Viasat), but may be the case with some cable internet providers as well. Allconnect’s internal data found that around 15% of internet users aren’t getting the speeds they’re paying for.

Joe Supan

Written by:

Joe Supan

Senior Writer, Broadband Content

Joe oversees all things broadband for Allconnect. His work has been referenced by Yahoo!, Lifehacker and more. He has utilized thousands of data points to build a library of metrics to help users navigate these … Read more

Robin Layton

Edited by:

Robin Layton

Editor, Broadband Content

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