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Internet providers in your area

We combed through the fine print to help you compare the speed, pricing and customer service from the internet providers in your area.

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Shop for internet with confidence

How can you find internet service providers in your area?

Many Americans don’t have a whole lot of choice in their internet — around 1 in 4 can only access broadband through one provider — so most of us just go with whichever provider is in our area. But if you’re lucky enough to have options, we’ve analyzed all the nationwide players, comparing speeds, customer service ratings and pricing to discover which deserve the title of best internet providers.

Where to find the best internet providers

When shopping for a new internet service provider, it’s likely you’ll discover internet options you previously didn’t know were available. It’s just as likely, however, that some ISPs you thought were (or hoped would be) available are not. Broadband access can vary significantly even in a single community, where one side of a street has access to fiber optic, for instance, and the other side does not.

If fiber optic internet is available in your area, it will almost always give you the fastest, most reliable speeds for the best value. If you can’t get fiber, your next best option is cable internet, but DSL may be a better choice if you’re looking for the cheapest plans. Lastly, satellite is a common go-to internet service in rural areas where fiber and cable are not available. Residents of rural areas may want to consider fixed wireless providers since they often have lower latency and higher data allowances than satellite providers.

Internet availability and service areas

Don’t see your local home internet provider?

The service providers listed above cover most of the U.S. population, but there are hundreds of smaller, regional providers. These providers extend internet coverage to areas where the largest providers do not reach or provide some often much-needed competition in areas where there is already a major internet provider established. 

We’ve listed some of the top regional providers and their service areas below, but there may be other internet options in your area.

Top regional internet service providers and service areas

  • Atlantic Broadband – Available in 10 states. Primary service areas include eastern Connecticut, Maryland and Virginia, central Pennsylvania and New Hampshire and the Aiken, South Carolina area.
  • Mediacom – Available in 22 states. Primary service areas include the Midwest, South and communities along the Atlantic coast in Delaware and North Carolina.
  • Optimum – Available in four states. Primary service areas include Brooklyn, NY and the greater New York City region.
  • RCN – Available in five states. Primary service areas include Chicago, IL; Boston, MA; Manhattan and Queens, NY; Allentown and western Philadelphia, PA and Washington D.C.
  • Sonic – Available in California. Primary service areas include the greater Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose and Santa Rosa areas.
  • Starry Internet – Available in four states. Primary service areas include Los Angeles, CA; Denver, CO; Boston, MA; New York, NY and Washington, D.C.
  • Suddenlink – Available in 14 states. Primary service areas include select rural and suburban parts of Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas and West Virginia.
  • Windstream – Available in 18 states. Primary service areas include rural and suburban parts of the Eastern, Midwest, Southern and Southwestern U.S.
  • Ziply Fiber – Available in four states. Primary service areas include regions in the Pacific Northwest formerly served by Frontier.

Find internet providers near you

Whether you’re shopping for cheap internet, a faster plan or an all-around better internet provider, we can help you find the service that’s right for you.

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Compare the best home internet providers

Comparing providers head-to-head is one of the best ways to avoid overpaying for internet service or signing up for a plan that doesn’t fit your needs. Not all providers will be available in your area, but you can use this list to see how the largest ones compare to what’s available near you.

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Internet shopping tips from our experts

How much should I pay for internet? What’s a good internet speed? After 20+ years of helping people find the best internet service for their homes, we’ve become experts at answering internet questions like these and ones you may not know you had.

Internet 101

Don’t know a bit from a byte? We cut through the jargon to help you understand what kind of plan you actually need. Learn the internet terms you’ve always wondered about, what’s considered a good speed and the difference between upload and download speeds.

Read our first-time internet buyer’s guide

Speed is one of the most important considerations when choosing an internet service. The average household in the U.S. gets around 200 Mbps of download speed, but many people can get by with less. Discover what speeds you need and take our speed test to see what you’re currently getting.

Test your current speed

Finding affordable internet goes beyond comparing plan pricing. Look for hidden fees, price increases and data caps and cancelling service to get an idea of the true cost of internet. Also, be mindful of ways you can save, like switching providers or buying your own modem and router.

Learn how to lower your monthly bill

How to choose the best home internet service

Chances are, you don’t have a ton of providers to choose from when picking internet service. But even if you’re picking from a small pool, there are still a ton of questions you have to answer to make the best decision. Here’s what you should consider: 

  1. Decide how much speed you need. The average household in the U.S. gets around 200 Mbps of download speed, but many people can get by with less. 
  2. See what’s available in your area. If fiber optic internet is available in your area, it will almost always give you the fastest, most reliable speeds for the best value. If you can’t get fiber, your next best option is cable internet, but DSL may be a better choice if you’re looking for the cheapest plans. Lastly, satellite is a common go-to internet service in rural areas where fiber and cable are not available. Residents of rural areas may want to consider fixed wireless providers since they often have lower latency and higher data allowances than satellite providers.
  3. Read the fine print. Almost all providers charge extra fees for equipment rental and installation, but many also raise prices after the first year. It’s also worth comparing data caps and contracts between providers. 
  4. Consider buying your own equipment. Most providers charge $10-15/mo. for equipment, but you can almost always use your own to avoid that fee. Buying your own modem and router typically costs around $100. 
  5. Look at promotions for new customers. You can often find perks like rewards cards or free streaming subscriptions when you activate service. Factor in the dollar value for these extras before you make your final decision. 

Internet technology types

Not all internet connections are the same. Each internet type and provider presents specific advantages and potential disadvantages.

Internet provider FAQs

Is Allconnect an internet provider?

We don’t provide internet service ourselves, but we connect you with the providers that are available in your area.

Often, more rural areas have fewer internet provider options due to the high cost of the infrastructure. Satellite providers HughesNet and Viasat are available everywhere, but don’t expect the higher speeds you would get from fiber or even DSL connections. However, Starlink is the newest player in the field, with speeds up to 150 Mbps and a starting price of $99/mo.

Larger ISPs like Verizon and AT&T are expanding their service areas every year and the federal government is working to bridge the digital divide that exists in rural areas by providing funds for smaller ISPs to also expand.

Joe Supan

Written by:

Joe Supan

Senior Writer, Broadband Content

Joe oversees all things broadband for Allconnect. His work has been referenced by Yahoo!, Lifehacker and more. He has utilized thousands of data points to build a library of metrics to help users navigate these … Read more

Robin Layton

Edited by:

Robin Layton

Editor, Broadband Content

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